IN THE NEWS: Chinese Province Bans App-Based Homework

This Chinese Province Has A Good Idea To Save Children’s Vision!

A recent article in The Guardian highlights an important topic: technology-use and your child’s eyesight. It has been argued by many vision experts that we must beware! The use of laptops, pads and phones can be a strain on the eyes of children. There is even strong evidence that overuse can exacerbate certain vision weakness that are present genetically and this is a big deal.

We are of the view that what we know about screen-time is little short of a huge WARNING FLAG. Parents should not rely on screen time overall. In face, we caution all parents about replacing reading actual books and engaging with others as a way to teach and learn. Screen time has a place. This is unavoidable. This is more true than ever especially in our current world, but we must never lose awareness that its role can also be a detriment to our health and our vision.

THE LESSON: Make sure to limit your child’s use of screens as a way of reading and/or interacting with others.

Here is an excerpt of the article. May we learn from their experience and insight:

A Chinese province plans to ban teachers from assigning homework to be completed on mobile phone apps as part of efforts to preserve students’ eyesight.

Zhejiang, in the east of the country, issued a draft regulation last week and sought public comment. It is one of several provinces considering such measures.

Along with barring app-based homework assignments, the regulation would limit the use of electronic devices to 30% of total teaching time and encourage the issuing of paper homework to be completed by hand.

Soaring rates of nearsightedness have been blamed partly on screen usage. While China’s overall rate of myopia is 31%, among high school students it is 77% and 80% among college students.

The regulation aims to lower the proportion to 70% among senior high school students, with rates among primary school students targeted at 38% and junior high school students at 60%.

The regulation would prevent primary and middle school students from bringing electronic devices into classrooms without permission, restrict amounts of homework assigned and increase the time for breaks, sports and extracurricular activities.

It says no written homework should be assigned to first and second graders…

TO READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE, PLEASE CLICK HERE.

No Comments Yet.

Leave a comment